Regional Appellation

Regional Appellation

Regional appellation of Burgundy.
The appellation BOURGOGNE is restricted to wines grown within the defined area of this appellation.

Situation :
Bourgogne rouge comes from the Pinot Noir grape whose name can be traced back as far as 1375 and which gives birth to all the great red wines of Burgundy. It is delicate, highly valued and needs careful looking after during the growing season. It evokes images of plenitude and makes a fine starting point for further explorations into the world of red burgundies. 
Bourgogne blanc is a success story. It brings out the best of the Chardonnay grape, now grown everywhere but whose native home is Burgundy and which finds here its most sublime expression. The Controlled Appellation BOURGOGNE, authorised in 1937, extends to the three departments of Yonne, Côte-d’Or and Saône-et-Loire. 

Terroirs : 
Red wine : In many cases the regional Pinot Noir reds grow and flourish near more prestigious crus. These close neighbours are separated by only hundreds or sometimes even as little as tens of metres. The vineyards tend to be located along the foot of the wine-growing slopes on limestone soils mixed with some clays and marls. The soils are stony, rocky even, and quick-draining.
White wine : This wine is mostly grown on sites at the foot of the slopes but the nature of the soil varies according to each geographical situation. In the Côte-d'Or the soils are whitish or light grey marls and marly limestones, deep and not especially stony. 

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